27 Hours by Tristina Wright // Queer (!!) Teens In Space (!!) & I… Am Disappointed (!!!)

My relationship with this book is complicated.

Because a) this was so hyped… SO HYPED YOU GUYS and b) I love the cover (obviously this matters a lot) and c) the freaking LGBTQ+ representation was great (according to other reviews).

But I didn’t enjoy it as much as I expected I would have.

Image result for awkwardness gif

The writing was beautiful at times! I think this was mentioned in another review, but Tristina is very good at one-liners- I think she would work very well in marketing. That obviously doesn’t mean that she should work in marketing- but she would probably be fantastic at blurbing other books.

Also- there was a colonialism aspect of this book, which is addressed in this Goodreads review.

The author, Tristina Wright, actually responded to all of the comments in a post, and I think she handled it very well. She addressed how she doesn’t understand racism because she is white- and she apologizes for everyone that she has hurt.

Note- some links included in this post may be affiliate links, meaning that if you purchase the book, I get a small percentage of the cost. Except that’s only for the Book Depository link. Buy from the Book Depository link (if you want to…)

book synopsis

27 Hours by Tristina Wright

goodreads

amazon · book depository  · barnes and nobles

28526192

Rumor Mora fears two things: hellhounds too strong for him to kill, and failure. Jude Welton has two dreams: for humans to stop killing monsters, and for his strange abilities to vanish.

But in no reality should a boy raised to love monsters fall for a boy raised to kill them.

Nyx Llorca keeps two secrets: the moon speaks to her, and she’s in love with Dahlia, her best friend. Braeden Tennant wants two things: to get out from his mother’s shadow, and to unlearn Epsilon’s darkest secret.

They’ll both have to commit treason to find the truth.

During one twenty-seven-hour night, if they can’t stop the war between the colonies and the monsters from becoming a war of extinction, the things they wish for will never come true, and the things they fear will be all that’s left.

27 Hours is a sweeping, thrilling story featuring a stellar cast of queer teenagers battling to save their homes and possibly every human on Sahara as the clock ticks down to zero.

books

★★★☆☆

goodreads review

Like I said, it’s complicated. There were parts of this book that I thought were extremely cute and that I LOVED, and there were parts that kind of disappointed me, sadly.

And… yep, it’s complicated. My poor smol brain cannot handle my conflicted feelings about this book?? It’s hard enough for me to sort through different plotlines okay, why are you making me feel confusing emotions??

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THINGS THAT I REALLY FREAKING LOVED

The LGBTQ+ diversity!

All of the main characters were LGBTQ+! Here’s a list of their identities (as taken from another review):
1) Rumor Mora, who is biracial (Indian/Nigerian) and bisexual
2) Nyx Horca, who is hearing impaired, Latinx, pansexual, and chubby
3) Dahlia Adams, who is black, bisexual, and trans
4) Jude Welton, who is gay
5) Braedon Tennant, who is asexual
6) Yi-Min, who is gender neutral and uses “they” pronouns

However, in my opinion, the racial diversity wasn’t really done well? I’ll get to that later, though.

Personally, I cannot say if the LGBTQ+ representation was any good. However, other reviews that I’ve read say that the representation is fantastic, and that they were really able to connect with the characters.

Tristina is fabulous at one-liners.

Have you even read the synopsis? THE SYNOPSIS IS GREAT.

Tristina is really good at one-liners and all of the last lines of each chapter were so beautifully written and I loved them!

However, at some points there was too much of the one-lining that it felt a little piled on, but besides that, I really enjoyed the writing!

Lots of Real World Problems™

This book discusses propaganda and colonialism (albeit there were some parts where it was poorly handled, but I’ll get to that later).

During the book, Rumor and his friends discover that the Forest People actually have technology and aren’t “wild people” like they are expected to be, of course.

They also realize that “gargoyles” shouldn’t be called “gargoyles” and that they should be called “chimera” instead.

Snark.

Trick. I LOVE TRICK AHHH. He’s hardly a main character in the novel, but I still freaking love him! He’s funny, and honestly great with his sarcasm.

Some of the main characters also had a couple of funny moments, but it didn’t really happen enough for them to be considered “witty”.

There obviously must be consistency with the witty banter??

The Cover.

Um excuse me I WILL ALWAYS MENTION THE COVER.

I freaking love the cover? Although it gives off more of a dystopian-polluted earth feel, I still freaking love the color scheme. Yes.

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THINGS THAT I DISLIKED

*exhale*

I… think that there is SO MUCH potential for Tristina to improve upon her writing, but this book didn’t really work for me.

Of course, that doesn’t necessarily mean that it won’t work for YOU! If you love the sound of this book, OF COURSE you should go and check it out. A bad review shouldn’t stop you.

The racial diversity.

There IS racial diversity in this book.

However… there is hardly any examples of culture or HOW they are different.

If someone’s a different race, that should actually play into the story rather than just be mentioned maybe once or twice.

This made the fact that they were from certain places not seem as real, sadly.

Also~ there’s a review on Goodreads that I think is very important- there are some colonialism aspects of this book that some people were hurt by.

I know that Tristina, the author, responded to these comments very gracefully and kindly!

I’m still not sure if there’s magic in this book.

Nyx has the power to “talk” to the moon, or kind of communicate with it.

Jude has the power to see other’s emotions and personality through color.

HECK YES these are freaking cool powers, but… I still don’t understand how they work. WHY do they have these powers? WHY do some not have powers? Is it actually magic or some form of science?

To be honest I’d be totally cool if it was just science. Just… give us more of a reason why, I guess?

I’M A WEIRD POTATO AND I LIKE TO UNDERSTAND THINGS OKAY.

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SEE MY COOL AND WITTY TITLE?? OR DO YOU THINK IT’S HORRIBLE?? Well blame Shoutout to May because she came up with my blog post title! Yup she comes up with everything on my blog because I have no creativity. 

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Are you interested in reading this book? Do you like the cover? Do you enjoy reading science fiction? Do you like to understand things? Are you a weird potato like me?

 

24 thoughts on “27 Hours by Tristina Wright // Queer (!!) Teens In Space (!!) & I… Am Disappointed (!!!)

  1. I liked this book quite a bit overall, but I can definitely see what you’re saying here. I also would’ve liked more of an explanation of the kind of “powers” that Jude and Nyx had. I don’t necessarily need a concrete description of exactly how they work, but I guess I would’ve liked some sort of explanation of why they had these powers and why other people didn’t. Maybe we’ll find out more in the rest of the series? 😛 Regardless, great review!!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. i literally heard nothing about the colonialism controversy about this book,,, so much for being into the bookish community >.<

    anyways, nice review and nice picture!! it makes me so so happy to hear that all of the main characters are queer bc it really messes with the "straight/cis is the default" concept. and it's better than the books where pretty much everyone is straight/cis and then there are a few people who aren't.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Sad that you had such mixed feelings about this one. Great review tho and at least now you have one more book with a beautiful cover on your shelf 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  4. YES I AM A WEIRD POTATO. Alright, now that’s out in the open, I can actually comment on this lovely review. Aerm.
    I’m so sorry you had mixed feelings about this book. I had heard a bit of the issues that this book had with colonialism and the way it was handled in this book, but I’m glad to hear the author answered and apologized – as anyone should, really. ANYWAY, I am a bit on the fence about this book so far. I’m not a big sci-fi reader, even if I do read a couple books like these sometimes, and I am intrigued by the story and the writing style you mentioned a couple times. I’ll think about it for sure ahah 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Hmm I’ve seen this book around a lot (and the storm of drama that seems to follow it around) but I just wasn’t too interested by the synopsis…. and well, after reading your review it really doesn’t sound like my cup of tea… But I will admit, the cover is a beauty!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I love the idea of queer teens saving the universe, but the colonialism thing really sounds… eh. I found out about this book through Aimal’s review, so I haven’t had a first great impression haha. Glad to hear that the author responded to the criticism (and gracefully so!) so hopefully she’ll learn from this 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I AM SAD YOU WERE DISAPPOINTED! Because I remember how excited you were you got 27 hours of sleep XD

    And I heard a lot about the racial diversity from Aimal (who has NOW LEFT THE BLOGGING COMUNITY *wails*) and i think that can also be a huge problem!

    AND EWWW YOU LIKE THE COVER? Blegrh. I do NOT AT ALL. Yes i am a weird potato like you. WHAT HAPPENED TO POTATO ISLAND?

    Like

  8. Nice review but the author’s words about not understanding racism cos she’s white makes no sense and it’s very disrespectful to be frank. Why do some Whites expect other nationalities to understand and accept them but don’t want to do the same in return? I don’t think I’ll be reading this book. Just because I don’t like the author. Sorry for my rant here😂😂

    Liked by 1 person

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